videos

  • Sun
    Oct 08
    11:30 am -
    12:00 pm

The Filmosophers movie talk

Blade Runner 2049 opens this weekend. The 1982 original is one of our all-time Blade Runner 2049 posterfaves and this (very) long awaited sequel has been our most anticipated film all year long. We saw it and look forward to giving our re-view of this film instead of the usual pre-view. We agree with most of the excellent reviews: "Super-stylish and deeply human - even with androids and holograms around - the spectacular follow-up takes the detective story of the first film and turns it into a grand mythology of identity, memory, creation and revolution." "Immersing you in a complete wow, Blade Runner 2049 is the thinking person's sci-fi event of the year." "It takes on the themes and universe set forth in the original, then builds on them, and manages to live up to the massive expectations that greet it. This is no replicant, it's the real deal." We have already gone on record predicting Roger Deakins will win the Oscar for "Best Cinematography" (after 13 previous nominations w/o a win.) But did we enjoy this film achievement as much as admire it? There's much to discuss about Blade Runner 2049.

We'll also preview other new releases, including The Florida Project. "Director Sean Baker crafts one of the best and toughest films about childhood ever and gives a never-better Willem Dafoe a clear shot at an Oscar." - Peter Travers, Rolling Stone. Also, the "charming" documentary Faces, Places (Visages, Villages). "Sheer perfection. French New Wave veteran Agnes Varda and the young photographer JR leap fearlessly into the art of making art in the year's best and most beguiling doc." "Agnès Varda and JR's film develops into something approaching a manifesto for the possibility of shared happiness."

Also, what we've seen (Score: A Film Music Documentary) and more on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller, "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions."

Sometimes to love someone, you got to be a stranger. - Deckard, Blade Runner 2049

Filmosopher listeners know that we're big supporters of the current regeneration of Wonder Women posterthe Sacred Feminine, as manifest in films. After all it is our knowing - to you our opinion - that the Sacred Feminine is what's bringing in Sat Yuga. As filmosophers, we've been anticipating an increase in cinema's proto-feminists. By all accounts Wonder Woman appears to be a powerful expression of feminine potency, directed by Patty Jenkins, starring Gal Gadot, all wrapped in an "inspiring, hopeful, blistering, and compassionate" blockbuster movie.

"Wonder Woman is a cut above nearly all the superhero movies that have been trotted out over the past few summers." - Time Magazine "Director Patty Jenkins and her collaborators have taken the well-worn superhero origin story and invested it with a rich, sometimes revelatory depth of feeling." - LA Times "The moviegoing world deserves the best that Hollywood can deliver, and this time we've pretty much got it." - Wall Street Journal. "Witnessing such feminine power is mind-boggling and awe-inspiring" - Tribune News "Your daughters should love it -- and so should your sons." - Boston Globe "What lingers ... is the feeling of hope that the movie brings, that it someday might be possible for female rationality to defeat male brutality." - San Francisco Chronicle

We'll give our filmosophical take on Wonder Woman, other new releases and more, on the Filmosophers movie talk, with Chris Busch and Bruce Miller "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions."

"It is our sacred duty to defend the world. And it is what I am going to do." - Diana Prince, Wonder Woman

 

  • Fri
    Mar 31
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm
  • Sun
    Apr 02
    11:30 am -
    12:00 pm

The Filmosophers movie talk

It's a joy to know and co-host the Filmosophers with Chris Busch. He easily flows David Lynch: The Art Life postera deep awareness, which is a joy to experience and a benefit to any community he's part of. Recently this community's included Chicago, where Chris and his wonderful wife Julia have been in my opinion, working on the front lines of phase transition with the David Lynch Foundation. So cinematically speaking, it's a joy for us to talk about the new documentary film David Lynch: The Art Life. This film could be of interest to almost anyone who happens to read this post. "Jon Nguyen's carefully-calibrated ode to Lynch is in itself Lynchian, an essential picture for the director's legion of fans." - Screen International. "Extravagantly surreal as the products of his imagination may be, they are deeply rooted in personal history and philosophy -- and it's this connection that Jon Nguyen's disarmingly off-kilter documentary probes to rewarding effect." - Variety

We'll talk about the highly anticipated live action remake of the classic anime Ghost In The Shell (it's mostly about the visuals and Scarlett Johansson, herself a special effect :) and other new releases. Chris will re-visit 20th Century Women with me as I just saw this inspiring film from one of our fave writer/directors- Mike Mills (Beginners). There is a new "trailer-of-the-week" we encourage film fans to watch: Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets “Welcome to Alpha — the city of a thousand planets, where for hundred of years, every species has shared their knowledge, their intelligence. It’s paradise.”

All that and as much more as time allows, on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller, "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussion." Fridays 12:30 PM, again Sunday mornings 11:30.

"Sickness, corruption, fear in the air. It was so good for me." - David Lynch

  • Fri
    Mar 10
    1:30 pm -
    2:00 pm
  • Sun
    Mar 12
    11:30 am -
    12:00 pm

The Filmosophers movie talk

We've recently seen the top two films at the box office and look forward to Kong: Skull Island posterdiscussing how much we enjoyed them. Plus we have a review of the big-time (literally :) new release Kong: Skull Island.

 

We'll briefly revisit three of Hayao Miyazaki's classic Studio Ghibli films Shane & his dad saw yet again- Howl's Moving Castle; Nausicca Of The Valley Of the Wind and Castle In The Sky

 

All that and as much more as time (about 28 minutes) allows, on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller, "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussion." Fridays 12:30 PM, again Sunday mornings 11:30.

 "Run!!" - Kong: Skull Island

  • Fri
    Mar 04
    1:30 pm -
    2:00 pm
  • Sun
    Mar 06
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

Hey, far-out film fans. There are several new releases getting great reviews this Zootopia posterweekend. So-far we have 5 rated 100% thumbs-up and 5 rated 80% or higher on Rottentomatoes, the aggregate review site. The wide release of note is Walt Disney Animation Studios' Zootopia, directed by Byron Howard ("Tangled," "Bolt") and Rich Moore ("Wreck-It Ralph," "The Simpsons"). Currently there are 105 reviews available on RT, all but 1 are positive. "Heavy with pop allusions and references to crime underworld movies, including The Godfather and Chinatown, Zootopia is impressive in its visual conception and scope: At once straightforward and densely layered with wit and incident." - Village Voice. Apichatpong Weerasethakul (Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives), the Thai film director/screenwriter's latest: Cemetery of Splendor appears filmosophically intriguing. "To watch Cemetery of Splendor is to witness one of our finest filmmakers putting a spell on us. I can't say what everything in this elliptical movie means. But I sure know how it feels... astonishing." - Paste Magazine. "The experience of watching it is like dreaming with your eyes wide open." - Hollywood Reporter. There's the music documentary They Will Have To Kill Us First. "A profile in courage but also groove." - Village Voice, and The Boy and the Beast, which "confirms Mamoru Hosoda's reputation as one of the most interesting writer-directors working in Japanese animation." - LA Times.

We'll also review the Oscars and more, on the Filmosophers with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions". "You realize if the Oscars nominated hosts, I wouldn’t even get this job. You all would be watching Neil Patrick Harris right now." - Chris Rock, Oscar telecast

  • Fri
    Jun 05
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm
  • Sun
    Jun 07
    11:30 am -
    12:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

This first weekend in June may give us a top five summer blockbuster, the strikingly SPY poster well-reviewed: SPY, starring Melissa McCarthy. This is one of the films folks will be talking about during the early summer of 2015: "An inspired, uproarious spoof of espionage thrillers loaded with self-effacing performances and sharp jabs at workplace sexism." - RT The Filmosophers also enjoy it's female empowerment, an emerging theme this year. "Susan Cooper (Melissa McCarthy) is an unassuming, deskbound CIA analyst, and the unsung hero behind the Agency's most dangerous missions. But when her partner (Jude Law) falls off the grid and another top agent (Jason Statham) is compromised, she volunteers to go deep undercover to infiltrate the world of a deadly arms dealer, and prevent a global disaster." "It's a globe-trotting tour of McCarthy's talent, throughout which she's practically always kicking butt. Who was that double-O-what's-his-face, anyway?" - AP "Both the humor and action here are startling and visceral."

The truly appropriate summer release the Filmosophers are most anticipating this weekend is Love & Mercy: "an unconventional portrait of Brian Wilson, set against the era defining catalog of Wilson's music. The film intimately examines the personal voyage and ultimate salvation of the icon whose success came at extraordinary personal cost." "One of the most touching - and gripping biopics you will ever see." "It's a loving tribute to the Beach Boys and the man responsible for their distinctive sound, but it goes to deeper and stranger places than most movies of its kind." - A.O. Scott, "N.Y. Times"

We'll also talk about Jeremy Piven's Entourage; Charlie's Country; (personally) recommend the often maligned film The Judge with Robert Duvall & Robert Downey Jr. and more on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions". Fridays 12:30 PM again Sunday mornings 11:30. Read Neil Fauerso's review of Mad Max: Fury Road in "The Iowa Source". If interested it's absolutely optimal to see on a big screen. For us it was as entertaining the second viewing, if not more. I'm even more convinced it will get Oscar noms for Best Picture, certainly the brilliant George Miller for Best Director. It's an amazing film experience.

  • Fri
    May 29
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm
  • Sun
    May 31
    11:30 am -
    12:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

This weeks new releases include the disaster spectacle, San Andreas, with "a great Cinemacast and outstanding special effects" that "asks you to check your brain at the door, sit back, and enjoy CGI buildings toppling like Legos." Also, writer-director Cameron Crowe's Aloha, with a stellar cast that includes Bradley Cooper, Emma Stone, Bill Murray, Rachel McAdams and John Krasinski. We're big fans of Cameron Crowe (Jerry Maguire, Almost Famous, Say Anything) and hoped this would be a sparkling film experience. But alas, the critics consensus is Aloha finds Crowe "at his most sentimental and least compelling." 

We'll talk about that, other new releases, give our reviews of the big Disney release Tomorrowland, a small film titled Lourdes and more on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller, "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions." Fridays at 12:30 PM, again Sunday mornings 11:30.

Crowe displays a willingness to reach for ambitious ideas and big-hearted, emotionally naked moments that other name-brand filmmakers are too terrified to explore. Aloha is a big mess, but it's also at war with American cynicism, and wars get messy. - NPR

  • Fri
    May 15
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm
  • Sun
    May 17
    11:30 am -
    12:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

The Golden Age is being generated by the Sacred Feminine, as the "previously Mad Max: Fury Road postersuppressed goddess energy is emerging through humans and various institutions across the planet" (Writings From The One: 108 Insights From The Divine). One way this is expressed in movies is the rise of the feminine warrior. Emily Blunt in Live Die Repeat: The Edge Of Tomorrow a recent example. The great Charlize Theron takes it to another level in the ferociously awesome Mad Max: Fury Road. A kinetic, hallucinatory, boldly feminist chase flick that, with its vibrant color palette, harrowing stunt work and show-don't-tell style of yarn-spinning, leaves every Marvel movie and every Fast & Furious in its irradiated dust. - NPR A gleefully violent and improbably feminist phantasmagoria that turns epic road rage and long stretches of vehicular omnicide into an eye-boggling joy ride. - Wall Street Journal. Tom Hardy and Charlize Theron make a dynamite team, but Theron is the film's bruised heart and soul. So get prepped for a new action classic. You won't know what hit you. - Rolling Stone This spectacularly great reboot is surprisingly owned not by Hardy, who is fine, but by Charlize Theron. - N.Y. Post The shock, really, is how tender Mad Max: Fury Road ultimately becomes. The film just wraps that tenderness in one of the most epic action extravaganzas of recent years. It's enough to renew your faith in movies. - Boston Globe

We'll talk about that, other new releases, including Slow West "an inventive treat for fans of the Western" and more, on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions." Fridays 12:30 PM again Sunday mornings 11:30. "Wanna get through this? Let's go." - Charlize Theron, Mad Max: Fury Road

  • Fri
    Apr 11
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm
  • Sun
    Apr 13
    11:30 am -
    12:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

If you haven't had a chance to see The Grand Budapest Hotel yet, you're in luck. The Grand Budapest Hotel posterIt's been held over for another week at the Orpheum Theatre. We've seen it, Chris twice, and it's delightful. The critics consensus: "Typically stylish but deceptively thoughtful, The Grand Budapest Hotel finds Wes Anderson (Moonrise Kingdom; Rushmore) once again using ornate visual environments to explore deeply emotional ideas." 

If anyone can get me to watch a vampire film, it's Jim Jarmusch (Ghost Dog- The Way Of The Samurai). His latest Only Lovers Left Alive is getting good reviews. "...functioning beautifully as both an inventory of Jarmusch's literary, philosophical, and musical interests, and a larger comment on the follies of human existence. One of the best films of 2014."  

We'll talk about that, more new releases, what we've seen and more, on Filmosophers Movie Talk, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller, "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions." Fridays at 12:30 PM CDT, again Sunday mornings, 11:30. The Grand Budapest Hotel "This is about as fun as movie-going gets." - Anthony Morris, The Vine

  • Fri
    Mar 28
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm
  • Sun
    Mar 30
    11:30 am -
    12:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

Starting Friday at the Orpheum Theatre in Fairfield, Son Of God. "The life story of Son Of God posterJesus is told from his humble birth, through his teachings, crucifixion and ultimate resurrection." Churches who are interested in group reservations with discounted pricing please email orpheum@modernamericancinema.com

Interestingly, as reported in USA Today: "Not since The Ten Commandments and Ben-Hur more than a half-century ago has the film industry bankrolled religious-themed pictures as it has this year, with four big-studio Christian films storming the multiplex, along with dozens of art-house titles." This includes Noah, (out Friday) the story of the apocalyptic flood and the man who navigated it. Directed by Darren Aronofsky (Black Swan) and starring Russell Crowe. The film I'm most anticipating is Heaven Is For Real, starring Greg Kinnear, based on the #1 New York Times best-selling non-fiction book of the same name, about a boy who has visions of heaven in a near-death experience during surgery. Whoosh, it opens April 16th. We may invite Thomas "TJ" Gates in for that show. Thomas has his own amazing story.

We'll talk about that, what we've seen (twice Oscar nominated The Grandmaster) and more on the Filmosophers Movie Talk, with Chris Busch and Bruce Miller, "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions." Fridays at 12:30 PM, again Sunday mornings, 11:30. Peter- What are we going to do then? Jesus Christ- We are going to change the world. - Son Of God