1968

  • Thu
    Nov 08
    9:00 pm -
    10:00 pm
  • Sun
    Nov 11
    9:00 am -
    10:00 am

1968 - the best year ever?

what was the best musical year of all time? we're about to find out.

for the next few weeks, i'll review the contenders: those years that had surolling stonesch an explosion of new, creative, and influential music, that they are often spoken of as "the best year ever" for music...culminating shortly after the new year--or if you have mayan roots, after the end of the previous epoc--in my musical overview of the best year in music ever.

many people have already spoken and registered their votes. every listener and reader is invited to do the same. send me an email, a comment at the bottom of this or future blogs, or stop me on the street and let me know what you think. i'll tabulate all the votes, add my own, and then announce the results.

  • Thu
    Oct 25
    8:00 pm -
    9:00 pm
  • Sun
    Oct 28
    8:00 am -
    9:00 am

the best year of music

it's a common discussion among music affecionados--1968no, it's frequently an argument: what was the best overall year for music? old timers (and their children) fondly remember the music of the late sixties and early seventies. the beatles, stones, led zeppelin, jazz-rock, psychedelic...the music was exploding, and creativity was oozing. (it was a violent and sticky time)

1992 but maybe the era which saw the rise of grunge, took rap to a new level, the end of hair bands, and created a whole new wave of hard metal and electronic sounds, deserves some consideration.

since it's election time, it's time for you to vote. what was the best musical year? read on...

  • Thu
    Jun 14
    8:00 pm -
    9:00 pm
  • Sun
    Jun 17
    8:00 am -
    9:00 am

the best songs from 1968 got covered

the music from 1968 was so creative and fresh that it's still being covered by other artists these days.

i'll play three versions of fairfield friend mac gayden and buzz cason's "everlasting love" (you won't be bored, i promise you), plus original 1968 releases by burt bacharach and covers by...well, lots of people.

aimee mannmany people first heard aimee mann's [left] version of the song "one" during the opening credits of the movie "magnolia" (which i will play) or maybe the raucus climax of three dog night's version, but today you'll the orignal lonely tune by harry nilsson. the doors' "hello i love" was amped up a bit by oleander's 2000 version, with an intro built around the doors' outro bassline.

my favorite this week is sergio mendes & brazil 66's version of "the look of love."

all the songs are listed here.

  • Thu
    May 31
    8:00 pm -
    9:00 pm
  • Sun
    Jun 03
    8:00 am -
    9:00 am

1968 covered (2 for the free price of 1)

one way you can judge the creative explosion of the music that was released in 1968 is by the number of other artists who cover, copied, or copped their songs. this week i feature songs that were released in 1968 that were quickly covered by someone else later in the year.

ramoneseveryone has heard jimi hendrix's "all along the watchtower," but not as many people know dylan's original folksie version released earlier in the year. hugh masekala's "grazing in the grass" was a 1968 jazz instrumental until the friends of distinction added lyrics and sang their version later in the year.

after hearing louis armstrong's delightfully sweet "wonderful world," years later the ramones tapped into its subconscious angst with their version.

click to read more

  • Thu
    May 17
    8:00 pm -
    9:00 pm
  • Sun
    May 20
    8:00 am -
    9:00 am

The 1968 jazz/blues/rock explosion

frank zappa

 

The year 1968 saw rock musicians everywhere playing blues and jazz. The wasn't necessarily a good thing, as every skinny kid from Hoboken was suddenly in a blues band.

But it did result in a diverse explosion of playing styles and creative moments, as bands like (the pre-weenie) Fleetwood Mac's tasteful guitarist Peter Green, Canned Heat's creative bassist Larry Taylor, and Cream's interchange between bassist Jack Bruce and guitarist Eric Clapton, opened musical doors for the world.

I'll close out the show with extended performances by Frank Zappa [left] & his Mothers of Invention and Miles Davis, that helped extend our attention spans beyond the 2 1/2 minutes of most pop records.

Click this link to what you'll be hearing.

  • Thu
    Apr 19
    8:00 pm -
    9:00 pm
  • Sun
    Apr 22
    8:00 am -
    9:00 am

1968 - The best pop, and the best underground (indie and edgy)

1968 was a schizophrenic year, featuring at once, the best and catchiest pop music (which is still being imitated wildly today), heard on AM radio, such as The Hollies [left], Mary holliesHopkin, The Turtles, The Mamas and Papas, and The Rascals,grace slick

and

. . . 

in the same year, the most experimental, edgy, and creative music (which smashed lots of musical boundaries forever), on FM radio, featuring an extended jam by Canned Heat, a forgotten hit by Frank Zappa, a psychological and psychedelic profile by Jefferson Airplane [right], and a song by the female singer who has influenced many, many, many of the young female singers today, namely Janis Joplin.

The songs.

  • Thu
    Feb 16
    9:00 pm -
    10:00 pm
  • Sun
    Feb 19
    9:00 am -
    10:00 am

1968 - The Kinks and Lothar

Many artists got serious with their music in 1968, marking the early years of progressive rock, classical rock, and ponderous instrumental jams. This week's show has none of that.

This week I start my show off with side one of The Kinks' best album, "Village Green Preservation Society." These are catchy tunes, with a satirical kinksvoice that never takes itself seriously. It is composer/singer Ray Davies' [in red] masterpiece, and considered one of the top 250 albums of all time. "People take pictures of each other just to prove that they love one another, and to prove that they really existed...."

My other featured album from 1968 is Lothar and the Hand People, one of the first bands to integrate the sounds of the synthesizer with strong vocals and unique compositions...and again, a great sense of humor--something all rock musicians should have. You'll love "Sex and violence" and their ode to laughter, "Ha ho."

Read more...

  • Thu
    Jan 05
    9:00 pm -
    10:00 pm
  • Sun
    Jan 08
    9:00 am -
    10:00 am

1968 & the White Album

My musical review of the year 1968 continues with The Rolling Stones, and is followed by one of the great guitar notes (and solos) you will ever hear (I'm not revealing it here, you'll have to tune in to find out).

strawberry alarm clockThe Strawberry Alarm Clock were considered a one-hit wonder with "Incense and Peppermints," but this week's delightful "Sit with the Guru," is also memorable for its pseudo spiritual references. And then there's the equally good-intentioned if naive "Love beads and meditation" by The Lemon Pipers.

More musical meditations with The Moody Blues' "Om" and the entire Beatles "White Album" condensed into one 20-minute meditation, featuring the mantra "Number 9."

The rest of the play list is: here.

  • Thu
    Dec 08
    9:00 pm -
    10:00 pm
  • Sun
    Dec 11
    9:00 am -
    10:00 am

1968 part 3

mary hopkinThe remarkable musical year 1968 saw the first release from Todd Rundgren's group Nazz, and Welsh singer Mary Hopkin [left], who followed the success of the first record released on the Beatles' Apple Records--"Those Were the Days"--with versions in French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Hungarian, and German (that's the version I play on this show).

It was also the year a number of artists released stunning second albums: Cream, Janis Joplin, and Sly & the Family Stone. And even though albums fully came into their own, singles were still going strong, with the likes of The Doors, Johnny Taylor, and Johnny Cash.

Also on this week's show is a remarkable outtake from The Beatles' White Album, written by John Lennon in India, called "Child of Nature." It'll sound familiar because the lyrics were re-written a few years later and released as an altogether different song, but this one has an innocence that wasn't there in the later version.

Here's what you'll hear.