George Harrison

  • Thu
    Oct 24
    8:00 pm -
    9:00 pm
  • Sun
    Oct 27
    8:00 am -
    9:00 am

the beatles album after the beatles broke up

the beatles broke up in 1970, but 3 years after that, they each released solo albums that collectively, could have been another great beatles album. 

george harrisonin 1973 george harrison's "living in the material world" was perhaps the most creative of each of their solo efforts, and this week's show features several brilliant songs from that album.

also released 40 years ago was mccartney's classic "band on the run," lennon's "mind games" and ringo's collaboration with the band also would have made some great contributions to the 1973 album that wasn't but could have been.

  • Thu
    Feb 14
    9:00 pm -
    10:00 pm
  • Sun
    Feb 17
    9:00 am -
    10:00 am

the 1970 beatles album that could have happened

the last recording the beatles famously made was 1969's "abbey road." but a year later, all four of them were still at the top of their game, energetically, creatively, albeit individually, each releasing solo albums.

john lennonwhat would a 1970 paul mccartneybeatles album have sounded like? like this week's show.

this week i've created the beatles' 1970 album that never happened, featuring their 1970 songs & sequences (side 1 and 2) they would have likely be released if... here are the track listings.

  • Thu
    Dec 13
    9:00 pm -
    10:00 pm
  • Sun
    Dec 16
    9:00 am -
    10:00 am

rest in peace george and ravi

Their music couldn't have been much different, but their friendship and love of gandharva music brought George Harrison and Ravi Shankar together for several interesting musical collaborations.

ravi shankar, george harrisonMore than anyone, George introduced Indian music to European and American audiences, and more than anyone, Ravi was Indian music. Two years before George's death they produced a collection of Indian chants and devotional music, and in 1974, made the surprisingly successful "Shankar Family & Friends." Featuring modern compositions, its Indian flavors, melodies, and tonalities, have western emphases and punch. It's an idea that might make one cringe, but (with one awkward exception) really hits the mark of creativity, freshness, traditional sounds, and surprises.

The personal and musical friendship between Ravi Shankar and George Harrison has been known and well documented for decades now. It was a friendship that was powerful enough to make an impact on the large, musical life of the late nineteen sixties and it reverberates, as clearly, even today.
Composer Philip Glass

The playlist is hither.

  • Thu
    Sep 06
    8:00 pm -
    9:00 pm
  • Sun
    Sep 09
    8:00 am -
    9:00 am

ten years ago

red hot chili peppersten years ago, we were gathered around the old tube radio, trying to dial in some late night dj playing the newest cd by the red hot chili peppers' [left] and...well, perhaps our radios didn't have tubes then, and maybe no one was listening to radios, even back then.

[WORD: Mike Ragogna interviews chili pepper drummer Chad Smith Thu Sep 13 at 1pm.]

but my point is that 10 years ago, musically, seems like a long time. and yet, strangely, most of the artists who were making creative and interesting music then (coldplay, infected mushroom [right], the flaming lips, gorillaz, of montreal), are still making it today (two exceptions being george harrison and the one hit wonders, las ketchup).infected mushroom

this week, take a look back 10 years ago, and then ponder this: will we still be listening to these same artists 10 years from now? listen to my 2022 show to find out.

all the artists and all their songs are listed here: 2002.

  • Thu
    Dec 13
    9:00 pm -
    10:00 pm
  • Sun
    Dec 16
    9:00 am -
    10:00 am

Ravi Shankar & friends

Their music couldn't have been much different, but their friendship and love of gandharva music brought George Harrison and Ravi Shankar together for several interesting musical collaborations.

ravi shankar, george harrisonMore than anyone, George  introduced Indian music to European and American audiences, and more than anyone, Ravi was Indian music. Two years before George's death they produced a collection of Indian chants and devotional music, and in 1974, made the surprisingly successful "Shankar Family & Friends." Featuring modern compositions, its Indian flavors, melodies, and tonalities, have western emphasis and punch. It's an idea that might make one cringe, but (with one awkward exception) really hits the mark of creativity, freshness, traditional sounds, and surprises. more

The personal and musical friendship between Ravi Shankar and George Harrison has been known and well documented for decades now. It was a friendship that was powerful enough to make an impact on the large, musical life of the late nineteen sixties and it reverberates, as clearly, even today.
Composer Philip Glass

The playlist is hither.

  • Thu
    Oct 06
    8:00 pm -
    9:00 pm
  • Sun
    Oct 09
    8:00 am -
    9:00 am

george and the search for the lost chord

In 1968 the george harrisonBeatles were still masters of the musical universe, but George Harrison was coming into his own and left us a few discarded gems. The first half of this week's show features demos and outtakes of songs written by him in 1968. Some were given away; some were re-done; and some were never released. All add to George's legacy, and have lasting freshness and depth. Vedanta and the Tao Te Ching's greatest hits.

The second half of this week's show features the best tracks from another spiritual  classic from 1968: The Moody Blues' "In search of the lost chord." Be prepared to be transported, or otherwise sent beyond time and/or space. If you are driving, please pull over to the nearest rest stop.

Here's the entire playlist.

  • Fri
    Sep 30
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm
  • Sun
    Oct 02
    12:00 pm -
    12:30 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

The David Lynch Foundation is pleased to announce an exclusive preview screening of Living in the Material World, the new documentary on the life of George Harrison, directed by Academy Award winner Martin Scorsese. Martin and Olivia Harrison are great friends and supporters of the David Lynch Foundation and offered the film to be used for a benefit event. The movie will be shown at the Sondheim Center for the Performing Arts this Sunday evening, October 2nd at 7:00pm.

Extraordinary footage from both the Beatles George Harrison posterera and post-'60s period, along with revelatory, often beguiling commentary from a host of intimates and a treasure trove of musical delights, combine to create a personality portrait of welcome depth about a musical giant who often seemed to stand a bit in the shadows of his more exuberant peers. The film is 209 minutes long and will be shown in two parts with a 15-minute intermission.

This will be an inspiring experience for anyone who's enjoyed the Beatles music, even more so for those who grew up listening to the Beatles. But for those of us who are all that and resonate with George's spiritual path, this evening together at the Sondheim will be extraordinary. See the trailer at georgeharrison.com

We'll talk about that, new releases, what we've seen and more, on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch and Bruce Miller "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions."

"People always say I'm the Beatle who changed the most.
But really, that's what I see life's about." - George Harrison

Syndicate content