Dr. Alarik Arenander

 Lukas VolgerLast time Lukas Volger was on the show we discussed his book, Veggie Burgers Every Which Way.  Since that time Lukas has expanded what now is a mini creative empire. 

He has written another book, Vegetarian Entrees, started a company that makes veggie burgers and sells them through retailers in the northeast like Whole Foods, created a digital quarterly, Feast by Lukas, that is available on the iTunes store, does cooking demos around the country, and even put together Lukas V’s Ultimate Vegetarian Dinner Party MixTape.  The guy’s taste in music is as classy as his burgers.

 

You can read about Lukas in the latest issue of Brooklyn Magazine, but tune in to hear him on GREAT TASTE.  He was kind enough to share the recipe below.  It’s from “Building Blocks”, the latest digital quarterly Feast by Lukas release.  

CLICK READ MORE BELOW FOR THE RECIPE AND INFO ON THE REST OF THE SHOW!

The Brain

NOTE:  This show is a rebroadcast from March 23, 2011.

GREAT TASTE gets a bit scientific this week as we explore the role food plays in feeding the brain.  It seems funny that little attention is paid to this particularly important part of the physiology in the course of general food discussions.  We're always talking about how a particular food affects the functioning of other organs or usually conversing about the sensory titillations we experience when eating.  But, our brain serves as the central hub for everything that happens to us processing information through as many as 1 quadrillion synaptic connections.

The BrainGREAT TASTE gets a bit scientific this week as we explore the role food plays in feeding the brain.  It seems funny that little attention is paid to this particularly important part of the physiology in the course of general food discussions.  We're always talking about how a particular food affects the functioning of other organs or usually conversing about the sensory titillations we experience when eating.  But, our brain serves as the central hub for everything that happens to us processing information through as many as 1 quadrillion synaptic connections.

If we are really taking care of physiological businesss we need to consider how to keep the brain in prime condition.  Rates of Alzheimer's disease are climbing dramatically, and some health experts believe that within the next 20 years one in every four adults in the US over 65 will contract the disease.  Perhaps the best strategy to combat brain-debilitating diseases is a routine designed to support the brain and its functioning?