james brown

  • Thu
    Apr 09
    8:00 pm -
    9:00 pm
  • Sun
    Apr 12
    8:00 am -
    9:00 am

1965-part 1

50 years ago was the height of pop music.

dozens of artists, whose names we still revere, were at the top of their game.

james brownthis weeks will be the beginning of a 5-week review of the best music released in 1965. i'll go alphabetically, beginning with the animals, the beach boys, the beatles, the byrds, the dave clark five, donovan, bob dylan, tom jones, the kinks, the lovin' spoonful, manfred mann, roger miller, otis redding, the righteous brothers, the rolling stones, sonny & cher, the temptations, the who, the yardbirds, and the zombies.

these won't be the elevator musak tunes you've heard 1000 times, but songs that'll be playing in your head til next week when i'll continue with my review of 1965.

the songs.

  • Thu
    Jul 19
    8:00 pm -
    9:00 pm
  • Sun
    Jul 22
    8:00 am -
    9:00 am

1962 songs that don't suck

yes, there was some good music in 1962, even though that was a year in the musical dead zone: after the rock and roll/r & b explosion of the 50s but before the beatles/rock revolution of the 60s.

los indios tabajarasthis week i'll play ray charles' "one mint julep" and his unfortunately schmaltzy arrangement of "i can't stop loving you," a fascinating mexican melody by brazilian classically trained guitarists los indios tabajaras (pictured, who were encouraged to dress up in native amazonian costumes), a slow blues by howlin' wolf, and songs from the debut albums of bob dylan and the beach boys. and some goofy songs as well.

in retrospect, i'd say that 1962's dearth of lasting music was compensated for by its uneven variety.

check out all the tunes here.

  • Thu
    Sep 30
    11:00 am -
    12:00 pm
  • Sun
    Oct 03
    8:00 am -
    9:00 am

1960

The music of 1960 was dominated by schmaltz, cutesy songs, and re-cycled rock n roll. But this week I've got an hour's worth of the good stuff.

rolf harrisMarty Robbins starts the show off with the tale of a love triangle that ends tragically. Fortunately the guitar fills and 3-part harmonies sound as fresh today as they did 50 years ago. Also fresh is the James Brown song "Think" and Ben E. King's "Stand By Me."

Even 50 years after the fact, Rolf Harris (left, who's a pretty mean painter too) will still make you laugh, Bernard Herrmann's final from "Psycho" will still send a chill, and Brenda Lee's soulful country voice still sounds beautiful and real.

Check out the full playlist at http://kruufm.com/node/8687