Writing for Film

Author B. K. Loren

 

What's B. K. Loren up to? Her novel THEFT's been optioned for film! B. K.'s writing the screenplay! She just won the 2014 Colorado Book Award for Creative Nonfiction for ANIMAL, MINERAL, RADICAL: A FLOCK OF ESSAYS ON WILDLIFE, FAMILY & FOOD!

Here at The Studio we're celebrating these successes of one of our favorite authors by rebroadcasting an interview in which B. K. explains in detail how she approaches writing, creativity, and life. 

  • Fri
    Feb 01
    2:00 pm -
    3:00 pm
  • Mon
    Feb 04
    9:00 am -
    10:00 am

Making a Movie with Caterina Titus

Caty TitusFor most writers, going from concept to finished product is a mostly solitary pursuit, and getting across the finish line is largely dependent on your own efforts.  With the sefl-publishing technology available today, you don't necessarily need anyone else in order to publish your work. But for a screenwriter, getting the script finished is only half the battle - if that.  What does it take to get a movie made?

Join Monica and Caroline on Writers' Voices this week as they talk to Caterina Titus, of www.rubystarproductions.com to learn more about the screenwriter's journey.  Caty is the co-writer of “Pyaar” - a social political feature film (with Stuart Tanner,) and romantic dramedy "Between Worlds" (with actor/director Ruben Pla.) Her goal is to create films that address the issues of globalization. For the last five years she has been developing a valuable network of contacts in the film industry as she focuses on getting her movies made.

Writers' Voices celebrates the Fairfield Film Festival by interviewing MUM Filmmakers Geoff Boothby and Cullen Thomas about their film, Wormtooth NationWormtooth Nation this Friday, Feb 6, at 1pm.

Originally conceived as a "steampunk Midsummer Night's Dream set in an underground city where no one ever dies", Wormtooth nation is a 9 part series available for viewing at http://theskyisfree.com or this weekend at the Film Festival.

Steampunk is a genre of retrospective science fiction in which fanciful technologies are suggested, even after we know better. Steam-powered space ships or coal-burning robots would be examples of "steampunk".

Much more than fanciful science fiction, Wormtooth Nation is laced with interesting philosophical questions. Would we fall in love with the same people if we had no memory? Would living forever REALLY be a good thing? Is a sense that there must be something more to life, evidence that there is?