Bruce Miller's blog

  • Fri
    Feb 06
    1:30 pm -
    2:00 pm
  • Sun
    Feb 08
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

The Matrix, released in 1999 by the Wachowskis, is one of the great movies of our Jupiter Ascending postertime. A mind-bending spiritual sci-fi /action-adventure, with ground breaking special effects, who's influence is still felt today. I vividly remember seeing it on opening night in Fairfield. We gave out Matrix posters, which I wish I still had today. Afterward everyone was buzzed and I exclaimed to Phil Scott "They could have called this The Maya!" I regard it as one of the most spiritual films of our time. Ever since, we've waited for their next film, hoping they could duplicate this- which certainly didn't happen with the next two Matrix installments, or since. Jupiter Ascending, the Wachowski's latest, opens today and unfortunately is getting mostly poor reviews. "The pundits say Jupiter Ascending is a marvel to behold on the big screen, but its muddled narrative fails to match the execution of its impressive special effects."

We'll talk about that, other new releases, what we've seen and more on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller, "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions". Fridays at 12:30 PM again Sunday mornings 11:30. "Visionaries often lose their way in their own visions. The majority of moviemakers and movies stick to outdated, predictable formulas and conventions. The Wachowskis, on the other hand, are not afraid to strand you early and often in Jupiter Ascending." - Chicago Tribune

  • Fri
    Jan 30
    1:30 pm -
    2:00 pm
  • Sun
    Mar 01
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

"It was a big weekend for Birdman, which moved into front-runner Oscar status with its Birdman posterScreen Actors Guild win, combined with the Darryl F. Zanuck award for Best Picture from the Producers Guild— elevating its status as the awards-season front-runner, since the last seven PGA winners have gone on to win the Best Picture Oscar. Birdman also fulfilled forecasts that it would resonate with the performers union members. Directed by Alejandro Gozalez Inarritu, Birdman was shot from the point of view of the actor, played by Michael Keaton. Birdman also stars Edward Norton, Emma Stone, Naomi Watts, Zach Galifianakis and Amy RyanBoyhood had been the consensus favorite to win the PGA trophy" and remains the Filmosopher's Oscar picks for Best Picture and Richard Linklater for Director.

The Filmosophers Movie Talk, with Chris Busch and Bruce Miller, "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions", Fridays 12:30 PM, again Sunday mornings 11:30. “On behalf of all of us, our only ambition was to make a risky and experimental exploration of the cinematic language, of an artist’s complexity played by the incredible Michael Keaton.” - Birdman Director Alejandro Gozalez Inarritu

  • Fri
    Jan 23
    1:30 pm -
    2:00 pm
  • Sun
    Jan 25
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

It's late January (gee zee pee zee, feels like the year is flying by already :) and Chris Busch had this acute observation: "January – where bad films are stillborn"
TAmerican Sniper posterhis includes movies with big stars, especially Johnny Depp in Mortdecai "a stunning misfire, a tonally-jarring would-be caper comedy that reduces its talented cast to broad, goofy caricatures."

You may be aware of the national buzz American Sniper is creating. Starring the very talented Bradley Cooper, this Clint Eastwood directed, Best Picture Oscar nominated film has literally become a cultural, political and box office phenomenon. We've seen and will talk about it.

In our self-proclaimed "golden age of the documentary" there's another intriguing release, the highly reviewed (100% thumbs-up as of this writing): Red Army "about the Soviet Union and the most successful dynasty in sports history: the Red Army hockey team." "From the USSR to Russia, the film examines how sport mirrors social and cultural movements and parallels the rise and fall of the Red Army team with the Soviet Union." "Emotionally charged, viscerally exciting and consistently enlightening"

We'll talk about that, other new releases, what we've seen and more on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions", Fridays 12:30 PM again Sunday mornings 11:30. "I'm willing to meet my Creator and answer for every shot that I took." --Chris Kyle, American Sniper

  • Fri
    Jan 16
    1:30 pm -
    2:00 pm
  • Sun
    Jan 18
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

Unbroken is held over at the Orpheum Theatre. Unbroken, about 1936 Olympic Oscar runner turned war hero Louis Zamperini, was nominated for Oscars for Cinematography, Sound Editing and Sound Mixing. "That Unbroken barely made a mark this awards season says a lot about what went wrong. However, that it's a film which must be seen on the big screen, says a lot about what went right as well." "Hugely inspiring" - ABC Radio

The Hundred-Foot Journey starring Helen Mirren shows free, Friday evening at the FF library. Doors open at 7:00, starts 7:30. "At its core, it's a movie about good food, and one man's passion for cooking."

There were Oscar surprises Thursday, both for those receiving and not receiving nominations. We'll talk about that, the new releases, what we've seen and more on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions", Fridays 12:30 PM, again Sunday mornings 11:30.

  • Fri
    Jan 09
    1:30 pm -
    2:00 pm
  • Sun
    Jan 11
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

Starting Friday at the Orpheum Theatre: Unbroken, "an epic drama that follows Unbroken posterthe incredible life of Olympian and war hero Louis "Louie" Zamperini (Jack O'Connell). Adapted from Laura Hillenbrand's enormously popular book." "I read it last year. Inspirational. Zamperini was an amazing guy. Unbroken is worth seeing." - Cliff Rose

This week some excellent films are adding several more screens- of most interest: Selma starts a run at the Ottumwa 8 Theatre. If you're attracted to award-worthy films, this one's well-worthy of your attention. The Filmosophers confidently predict this will be Oscar nominated for Best Picture, Ava DuVernay for Best Director and David Oyelowo for Best Actor as Dr Martin Luther King. "What Daniel Day-Lewis did for Lincoln, Oyelowo does for King, mimicking his behavior and speech uncannily. He is both completely believable and someone we've never encountered before." "If not quite in quality then certainly in import and impact, this is the film of the year - of 1965 and perhaps of 2014. - Richard Corliss, Time Magazine. "I have rarely seen a historical film that felt so populous and full of life, so alert to the tendrils of narrative that spread beyond the frame." - A.O. Scott, N.Y. Times. If it wasn't for the groundbreaking film Boyhood, I would say Selma would win the Best Picture Oscar.

Boyhood is out on video. An opportunity to enjoy this unique film experience, again (& again :). "In my 15 years of professional movie reviewing, I can’t think of any film that has affected me the way Boyhood did. It is not just that I was moved — I’m frequently moved — but that my critical impulse seemed to collapse, along with my ability to find the boundary between art and life. As it happened, it took a second and a third viewing for me to appreciate the ingenuity of Richard Linklater’s idea and the artistry of his methods." - A.O. Scott, N.Y. Times  "A cinematic masterpiece, conceived and directed by Richard Linklater, it's bound to be talked about for years to come." - Claudia Puig, USA Today

We'll talk all that and more on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions". Fridays, 12:30pm, again Sunday mornings 11:30. Boyhood opens on American life and offers a progress report on our spiritual condition. - A.O. Scott, N.Y. Times

  • Fri
    Jan 02
    1:30 pm -
    2:00 pm
  • Sun
    Jan 04
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

Held over at the Orpheum is The Theory Of Everything, included on "The Sate Theatre photoIndependent's" list of New Year's films to see: "it’s a moving, life-affirming portrayal of the eminent scientist’s life (Steven Hawking) from his student days at Cambridge to receiving his Companion of Honour from the Queen." You'll also enjoy Eddie Redmayne's Oscar nominated-to-be performance.

Al Green, Craig Stamps and I saw The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies at the historic State Theatre in Washington (see pic). It was their first time back in 2-3 decades. The State first opened in 1893. Therefore, I say the 1902 pioneer film A Trip To The Moon so wonderfully realized in the must-see (in 3D, IMO) 2011 film Hugo, starring Ben Kingsley as Georges Méliès, was shown as a new release feature film sometime early in the century at the State. They still feature a curtain rising before every show. How cool is that? From my perspective, Brother Al had a joyful reaction. And of course Brother Chris has seen The Battle Of The Five Armies more than once.

We'll also mention new releases, including young talented Director J.C. Chandor's (All Is Lost; Margin Call) latest well-reviewed film: A Most Violent Year ; some of 2014's highest rated films and more, on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch, special guest Al Green and Bruce Miller, "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions". Friday 12:30pm, again Sunday mornings 11:30. "One day I'll remember. Remember everything that happened: the good, the bad, those who survived... and those that did not." - Bilbo Baggins

 

  • Fri
    Dec 26
    1:30 pm -
    2:00 pm
  • Sun
    Dec 28
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

Elf posterHeld over at the Orpheum: The Theory Of Everything, starring Eddie Redmayne as the young astrophysicist Stephen Hawking. "I saw The Theory of Everything tonight, glad I went. Very powerfully done!"- Ken "Special K" Chawkin

We'll alert you to the new releases, including the on, then off, now on again release of The Interview. I agree with Mike Hale of the New York Times who wrote “the only real mystery is how something this ordinary could have caused so much agitation.”

I've watched Elf, starring Will Ferrell twice this holiday season and it remains my favorite Christmas movie. I laugh, I'm entertained and best of all, it rallies the Christmas spirit. I'll offer why I feel this is a holiday classic. "One of those rare Christmas comedies that has a heart, a brain and a wicked sense of humor" - Roger Ebert. "Jon Favreau's direction has a relaxed, swinging rhythm, a reflection of the hipster nonchalance that has defined his acting style." - AO Scott, N.Y. Times. "Funny and intelligently made, a film for kids and adults that's both sweet and sardonic. It takes the clash between the world as we know it and the world as it exists in Christmas stories and exploits that contrast to expert comic effect. - Mick LaSalle, S.F. Chronicle. "Elf's an example of the good things that can happen when hipsters do it on the square. It manages to be both genuinely sweet and just a teensy bit wised up, bringing sophisticated glee and a sense of innocent fun to what could have been a moribund traditional family film."- Peter Travers, Rolling Stone

We'll talk about this and more on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions", Fridays at 12:30 PM, again Sunday mornings 11:30. "This holiday, discover your inner elf"

  • Fri
    Dec 19
    1:30 pm -
    2:00 pm
  • Sun
    Dec 21
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

At the Orpheum is The Theory Of Everything, starring Eddie Redmayne in a The Theory Of Everything posterprobable Oscar nominated performance as astrophysicist Steven Hawking, "who falls deeply in love with fellow Cambridge student Jane Wilde. Once a healthy, active young man, Hawking received an earth-shattering diagnosis at 21 years of age. With Jane fighting tirelessly by his side, Stephen embarks on his most ambitious scientific work, studying the very thing he now has precious little of - time." "A brainy bio that exerts a gravitational pull on the heartstrings."- Joe Williams, St. Louis Post Dispatch.

Chris Busch has reviews of three intriguing new films movie fans will be interested in: The Imitation Game, starring Benedict Cumberbatch, in "an intense and haunting portrayal of a brilliant, complicated man who was credited with cracking the so-called unbreakable codes of Germany's World War II Enigma machine."

Also: Wild, starring Reese Witherspoon in the true story of Cheryl Strayed. "After years of reckless, destructive behavior, Strayed makes a rash decision. With absolutely no experience, driven only by sheer determination, Cheryl hikes more than a thousand miles of the Pacific Crest Trail, alone." "Imitation Game and Wild are two of the best movies of the year." - Chris Busch, Filmosopher

The third film: Top Five, written and directed by Chris Rock. Mingling echoes of Woody Allen and Dick Gregory Top Five digs under the surface of show business, politics, rap, and the exigencies of being black."

We'll also cover other new releases and more, on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions." Fridays 12:30, again Sunday mornings 11:30. "There should be no boundaries to human endeavor. We are all different. However bad life may seem, there is always something you can do, and succeed at. While there's life, there is hope." - Steven Hawking, The Theory Of Everything

  • Fri
    Dec 12
    1:30 pm -
    2:00 pm
  • Sun
    Dec 14
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

Boyhood posterHeld over this week at the Orpheum Theatre: Rosewater. "Timely, solidly acted, and unabashedly earnest, Rosewater serves as an impressive calling card for first-time director Jon Stewart."

This is the time of year when most award worthy films are released, so they'll be fresh in the voters minds. Director Richard Linklater's Boyhood was released last July, in the middle of summer blockbuster season. We found it so profoundly groundbreaking we predicted it would win the Oscars for Best Motion Picture and Best Director, seven months before the Oscars, without even knowing it's "competition". How do we feel about our predictions five months later? This article from Indiwire, published December 11th: 

"We've long since stopped trying to keep a tally, but chalk up yet another win for Richard Linklater's "Boyhood." The movie has been pretty much unstoppable this month, topping lists of critics, various publications and more, and has gone from dark horse contender to serious frontrunner. Well, you can add another tally mark for the film.

The New York Times film critic A.O. Scott revealed his top ten films of the year today, and Boyhood of course, is at the top and he is over the moon for it. "In my 15 years of professional movie reviewing, I can’t think of any film that has affected me the way 'Boyhood' did. It is not just that I was moved — I’m frequently moved — but that my critical impulse seemed to collapse, along with my ability to find the boundary between art and life," he wrote, adding: "...it took a second and a third viewing for me to appreciate the ingenuity of Richard Linklater’s idea and the artistry of his methods….It opens on American life and offers a progress report on our spiritual condition."

We'll talk about that, new releases, including films from Ridley Scott and Paul Thomas Anderson, what we've seen and more on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller, "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions", Fridays at 12:30 pm again Sunday mornings 11:30. "It's like, it's always right now." - Mason, Boyhood

  • Fri
    Dec 05
    1:30 pm -
    2:00 pm
  • Sun
    Dec 07
    12:30 pm -
    1:00 pm

The Filmosophers Movie Talk

Rosewater posterRosewater, Jon Stewart's based-on-fact film comes to the Orpheum this weekend. Starring Gael García Bernal, Rosewater is "a finely wrought, powerful drama that tells the true story of an Iranian-born journalist's imprisonment and torture by the Islamic regime in Iran." - Seattle Times "That the movie is as tense and chilling as it is owes much to first-time director Jon Stewart's keen eye for the way humor surfaces even in the dark places." - Peter Travers, Rolling Stone Do some quick research to read what inspired The Daily Show's Jon Stewart to make his feature film debut. "Stewart's wryly observant qualities as a TV star serve him well in his feature film debut." - Chicago Tribune Also at the Orpheum: Dumb And Dumber To is held over. Find showtimes at orpheumtheaterfairfield.com.

Among the new releases is Still Alice, starring Julianne Moore as a renowned linguistics professor who receives a diagnosis of Early-Onset Alzheimer's. Just from what I've read, Moore is my pick to win this year's Oscar for Best Actress. "Thanks to this brave and gutsy actress' overwhelming candor and sincerity, you go away feeling educated, enlightened and more compassionate than you can possibly imagine." - Rex Reed, New York Observer

We also have more impressions of Christopher Nolan's prodigious Interstellar, on the Filmosophers, with Chris Busch & Bruce Miller "where we give our filmosophy of the movies and have filmosophical discussions." Fridays 12:30 pm again Sunday mornings 11:30. "Parents are the ghosts of their children's future. I can't be your ghost anymore Murph. - Interstellar

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